April 21st, 2019

howbandaid

Tuesday, 23 April 2019

Today Gordon has his longest conversation with Allyson Creemore ever.


Panel 1: A little while later, Gordon apparently agrees to talk to Allyson on the phone and even more amazingly, Allyson is still on the other side of the phone after all the histrionics and horseplay from yesterday.  Let’s run this down:


  1. Michael needs $5 for his date with Martha. 

  2. Gordon agrees to let Michael have the $5 if he will call Allyson for Gordon. 

  3. Michael does call Allyson for Gordon, but as it turns out Gordon wants Allyson to join him on a double-date with Michael and Martha which he is calling “a bunch of us” as if it was a group date and not a double-date. 

Problems with Gordon’s behaviour:

  1. Gordon is lying to Allyson because the social ramifications of a group date are different than those of a double date.  On a group date, you can get away with not having to consider the romantic implications of being with Gordon.  Group dates are usually casual.  On a double-date, Allyson would definitely be there with Gordon and would be required to engage in that dynamic.  Gordon is playing dirty there because Allyson might be inclined to join a low key group date but might not want to go with a double date until she knows Gordon better. 

  2. Gordon has stretched his agreement with Michael from his making a phone call for him to an agreement to double-date with him and Allyson.  That puts pressure not only on Michael but also on Martha.  Gordon goes greedy on social obligations, which is a common theme for him.


Panel 2: I like the way Lynn had to draw Michael in this panel leaning to his right to get his head underneath Gordon’s word balloon.  I also like the way Gordon is peering to his right at Michael as if he kind of hoped Michael would not be there to eavesdrop on this conversation. 


Panel 3: I will try to ignore Michael’s “howcome” as one word.  That aside, let’s do what Lynn Johnston did not do, and consider this from Allyson’s perspective.  When we last saw Allyson, she had been giving off the heart shapes in Gordon’s direction which clearly indicated an interest in Gordon. 



As we will learn, Allyson has decided to lie to Gordon about where she is going to be tonight.  But why does she lie?  If she is not interested in Gordon, then you would think it would be easy enough to say, “I can’t.  I am going to the movies with Peter Kent tonight.”  Not only would it be true, but it put the kibosh on any further attention from Gordon.  Instead Allyson tells Gordon she is baby-sitting.  Why does she do that?  Doesn’t she know that Gordon will spot her at the movie theater? 

Actually she won’t.  Gordon says they are going out.  Yesterday, Michael said they were going to a show.  To me that doesn’t say “movie”. Why wouldn’t Allyson want Gordon to know she was going out with Peter Kent?   My guess is Lynn Johnston just sees this another element of the “Allyson Creemore is evil” character, so she is being mean to Gordon by lying to him.  However, if I were to take the comic strip on its merits, I would think another possibility is that Allyson’s heart shapes were genuine and she doesn’t want Gordon to know she has a date with another guy, so Gordon will ask her out at a different time when she is available.

Panel 4: I think Lynn Johnston was going for “Gordon, the sweet sentimental lug” instead of realizing that since Gordon goes to school with Allyson, he could have heard her voice every day. This statement implies that Gordon has alienated himself from Allyson at school during the one period of time when Allyson may have been interested in talking to him.  As usual, Gordon’s worst enemy is Gordon.

Summary: A Patterson makes a promise for money and keeps his promise.  Since this is old school Gordon Mayes, it’s still not over and Gordon will demand even more for his $5.