howtheduck (howtheduck) wrote in binky_betsy,
howtheduck
howtheduck
binky_betsy

Tuesday, May 30, 2006

Negotiation in relationships is a fine art. Let’s see how Paul and Liz work it out.

Panel 1:
Paul: He is using the pigeon-toed look to gain sympathy. This is usually not an effective method, as most girls don’t look at men’s feet. Dialogue-wise he is playing the victim, which is a reasonable tactic. Liz will not want to think of herself as the bad guy.
Elizabeth: Liz is leaning in as a comforter, which is an excellent tactic. Guys love to be comforted. Unfortunately Liz has no practice in this role, as she has positioned her body at a distance, so she actually has to lean over to reach Paul. Dialogue-wise she opens with the apology, which is good. Then she states her case of not wanting to lose him. Also good. But she bungles it by playing the same “I’m so confused” angle that failed her yesterday.

Panel 2:
Elizabeth: A nice recovery as Elizabeth introduces her alternate plan that he could move south. But oh, a mistake with the use of the word “opportunities.” This implies that Paul might have to work in a different profession to follow her. However, she does a nice follow-up with the simple, but poignant “come with me.”
Paul: Paul has no snappy comeback. He has reverted to imitating Rodin’s The Thinker. I would say Liz is gaining ground.

Panel 3:
Paul: Rodin gave him the time to recover. He invokes his provincialism, which is a weak argument considering to whom he is speaking. But then he unloads the “love” word and fires with both barrels. “Loved the area” and “loved me”. Direct hit, Constable Wright. You have drawn blood and gotten Liz to give you a facial expression of actual concern.
Elizabeth: And for the first time in the strip, Liz admits to loving Paul Wright. But will it be in time?

Panel 4:
Paul: Paul leverages off the “love” admission and repeats his perspective, but oh no, it is without a compromise position. You have to give something constable, like a “we’ll visit the south every summer and on holidays.” Now you have left yourself open to being branded as inflexible.
Elizabeth: Elizabeth resorts to Rodin’s The Thinker also, except it’s The Thinker who covers his eyes completely. She may have thought that this will give her time to think of her strategy for tomorrow as it did for Constable Wright, but by using the exact same words he did 2 panels earlier, her position is weakened by making it look as though making a joke is more important to her than saving her relationship. A very weak ending for Liz, I must say.
Tags: howtheduck, liz an' paul, paul is toast, paul's transfer(s), white goose flies south
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